Celebrate the Children’s After School Enrichment Program

Celebrate the Children pic

Celebrate the Children
Image: celebratethechildren.org

Licensed psychologist Dr. Herbert “Herb” Tannenbaum earned his PhD from New York University and has been in private practice for more than four decades. Working with couples and individuals, he assists with a wide range of psychological issues. Herb Tannenbaum, PhD also helps others outside of the realm of mental health through his support of such charities as Celebrate the Children (CTC).

As part of its mission to serve children with communication and relational difficulties, Celebrate the Children maintains numerous academic programs in addition to its regular curriculum. One of these programs is the CTC after school program. This enrichment program is made available to students at the CTC school, as well as students and peers attending other schools in the area. It is designed to help students with special needs find peer support and expand their education beyond the school’s normal academic hours.

Most of the CTC after school enrichment program classes are offered in three semesters. The school’s first semester lasts from September through December, while its second and third semesters run from January through March and from March through June, respectively. Each semester hosts classes for a wide range of ages and classes are available from Monday through Thursday. The actual length of each class varies, as does the cost of tuition.

Herbism of the day: IF YOU WANT TO BE LOVED, BE A LOVER by Herb Tannenbaum, Ph.D.

February is famously known for Valentine’s Day- a day to celebrate love and the importance and sacredness of our love relationships.

The importance of celebrating the specialness of our adult love relationships and the one we love is critical to helping keep relationships meaningful and full of a sense of aliveness and passion.

According to Imago Relationship Therapy founded and developed by Harville Hendrix, Ph.D. and Helen LeKelly Hunt, Ph.D. Relationships navigate through various stages in their evolution toward consciousness. The Romantic phase is the powerful elixir that allows us to bond and move forward into the magical mystery of adult love. It is often filled with a great sense of aliveness. There is a sense of familiarity, as if we know this person from another time in our lives. In addition, there is a sense of timelessness, as if we have known this person forever. Furthermore, there is a sense that we cannot live without this person in our lives as our sense of being depends on being in relationship with them. Finally, there is often a sense of wholeness that we get from being in romantic  relationship as if we are whole and fully alive. Ah, how sweet it is!

Inevitably, Romantic Love ebbs away and it is replaced by us not only seeing all the positives of our partners,  but we become aware of the parts of our partner that we don’t like or feel are  misattuned to our needs and that are re-wounding or hurtful to us. Often, folks reply with despair and a sense of hopeless tothis ienvitiable phenomenon. More importantly, often couples get stuck in this stage of the journey leading to less contact and connection. It becomes a power struggle in which each partner tires to will their way in the relationship or withholds in reaction to the hurt or pain they are experiencing. It is a dark time and leads to feelings of unsafety and defensiveness cascading to even more disconnection and despair.

The good news is that there is hope beyond the Power Struggle. In Imago Theory it is referred to as “the Conscious Relationship”. A conscious relationship calls for a tool for partners to stay in connection and to recognize that they are one as a couple and yet have a separate experience than their partner and that each partners world needs to be heard and validated.

In addition, partners need to refuel their relationship by consciously re-introducing caring behaviors form the past (that were lost in the power struggle) as well as being curious and finding out from their partner the ways they feel cared for and loved. Furthermore, by listening to your partner’s desires and surprising them with those behaviors helps shift the neuro-chemistry of the brain from reactive/defensive behaviors into a safer and less defensives ways to experience each other. Safety allows  partners to be more spontaneous and therefore experience more aliveness.

As Valentine’s day approaches, ask your partner how they feel loved and cared for.  Then,  do what you can, even stretch yourself, to help your partner know that you care enough to honor their needs. It is powerful step in creating a safe and passionate relationship with the one you love!

Herb Tannenbaum, Ph.D., contact me at drhtphd@gmail.com. or visit my webpage http://www.herbtannenbaumphd.com.

 

THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS, ONLY SOLUTIONS! by Herb Tannenbaum, Ph.D.

My work as an Imago Relationship Therapist underscores that one of the challenges that couples face as they move from the romantic love into the power struggle and continue on the journey to a conscious relationship is to be able to reframe tensions and what are perceived as disagreements as opportunities for growth.

Neuropsychological research underscored that being able to think positively allows people to use the resource of the neo-cortex as compared to thinking of situations as “problems” or “challenges” invites more of the old brain structures of the brain to be leading the way. The “old brain” is much more susceptible to reactivity and thus folks can go into “fight or flight” type responses.

Being able to shift to seeing any situation as something that can have a solution harnesses an expansive way of thinking. For couples this is particularly important as they move toward consciousness. Consciousness calls the couple to stay in connection and to learn to navigate moving from emotional symbiosis to differentiation which means accepting that their partner is different and the tension of the difference in the relationship is an opportunity go grow and expand one’s sense of self and access to core energy. 

One of the key experiences that people report about the mulfliouness of romantic love is that there is a feeling of being so alive.  That feeling of aliveness is about core energy. Chanigning the paradigm form “problems’ to “solutions” is about accessing core energy for growth and expansion and allows people to feel more alive. In an adult love relationship the shift from “problems” to “solutions” as a way of connecting and interacting allows the relationship to become a soure and resource for more of a sense of aliveness. 

Given our desire to feel fully alive the paradigm shift of seeing opportunites in everything we do as a way of creating solutions–particularly solutions that promote safety and growth — is a critical path for couples to embrace and integrate into thier relatinship.

For more infomation visit my web site http://www.herbtannenbaumphd.com or vist me Facebook Page: herb tannenbaum phd.

 

 

 

 

The Psi Chi National Honor Society Graduate Fellowship Program

Psi Chi National Honor Society pic

Psi Chi National Honor Society
Image: psichi.org

Dr. Herbert (Herb) Tannenbaum holds a BA, MA, and PhD in psychology. Dr. Herb Tannenbaum also holds lifetime membership to the coveted Psi Chi National Honor Society, a society dedicated to promoting excellence in the study of psychology.

To promote the academic field of psychology, the Psi Chi National Honor Society maintains a graduate scholarship program for top undergraduate achievers in need of assistance with their tuition fees. The scholarship program offers eight graduate fellowships worth $3000 each every semester. To be eligible for the scholarships, applicants must be Psi Chi members enrolled in a psychology graduate program. Applicants also need to submit information on how they will use the funds. Preference is given to qualified students who do not have any form of assistance.

The recipients are selected from a pool of applicants by an independent panel. The panel evaluates each application on the basis of the applicant’s alignment to the goal of academic teaching, their qualifications for the scholarship, and their academic transcripts.